Book Review: It Gets Worse

Book Review: It Gets Worse

“The problems you have as a kid will seem ridiculous when you get older because bigger and worse problems will come along. But you will learn to deal with them easier as you grow up.”

Welcome to another book review! It’s been a while since my last one, but I actually just joined a book club, so that should help keep me on track with reading more often. Right now we are reading I am Malala, which is quite different than the book I will be reviewing for you all today. But the one element that connects the two is that they are both non-fiction.

Shane Dawson is someone that I have been familiar with for a while from watching his YouTube videos. His humor is outrageous and extremely self-depricating, so I knew his book would at least be entertaining.

It turned out to be much more than simply entertaining. I thought he did a great job of having a good mix of humor and seriousness. He covered some heavy topics such as his past eating disorder and his grandma passing away, and somehow managed to have me laughing in one sentence and covering my mouth in horror in the next. He has an understanding of the fact that even the most serious of topics have a grain of humor buried within them, and he tactfully extracts that humor at just the right moments.

His book was also extremely inspirational, which was something I didn’t necessarily expect. In one of my favorite chapters in the book, Human Trash, Shane tells a story about making a film for his class in high school, and how his teacher freaked out and turned off the film halfway through, saying it was terrible and that he was disappointed in Shane for making something so awful. Even at that age, Shane already knew he wanted to be a filmmaker, and the teacher’s harsh words really hurt him.  However, there was someone who disagreed with the teacher’s critique. The school principal saw the movie and called Shane into his office, and he had this to say:

“Shane, throughout your life some people aren’t going to get what you do. They won’t open their eyes to see the potential you have and see all the greatness you have in that head of yours. But there will also be people who do. People that get you. And I’m one of them.”

Shane says this conversation has stuck with him ever since. I think it’s so awesome that the principal not only understood him, but took the time to make sure he got the reassurance he needed to keep reaching for his dreams.

One of my other favorite chapters was the very last one, which was written by Shane’s mother. He writes that she always wanted to be an author, but was never able to follow through on that dream since she was a busy single mother. Shane chose to give his mom the gift of officially becoming a published author by letting her write the final chapter in his book. She wrote about the first time she saw him perform in a school play, and how the audience loved him and gave him a standing ovation. She said she had a feeling that night that in the future he would be impacting millions of people, not just one theater. And he certainly has, with more than 16 million total subscribers across his YouTube channels!

Overall I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who likes a good laugh (particularly if you don’t mind crude, irreverent humor), and who enjoys reading personal, true stories. Even if you’ve never heard of Shane Dawson, you will still enjoy reading it. He is honest and hilarious, and the book is a quick read that will have you both laughing and close to tears.

Hope you enjoyed my book review! Leave a comment below if you’ve read the book, or just let me know what the last book you read was.

Book Review: The Girl On The Train

Book Review: The Girl On The Train

girlontrain

I’m back with a much-overdue book review! If you read my October Favorites blog, you’ll know the I loved the book The Girl on the Train, and have been planning on writing a review of it since, well, October. So without further adieu, let’s jump right in!

“I have lost control over everything. Even the places in my head.”

The story follows a thirty-something named Rachel, who leads a rather depressing lifestyle that is hugely made up of lying to her roommate, drinking excessively, and crossing boundaries with her ex husband, Tom, and his new wife, Anna. As a form of escape, she obsesses over watching a certain couple every morning as she passes their house on the train. She thinks they look like the perfect couple, and invents an entire backstory and life for them, complete with what their names would be and what careers they have.

This alternate reality is shattered when the woman, who turns out to be named Megan, goes missing. Rachel feels somehow drawn to the mystery and feels like she needs to find out what happened, even though in actuality she has no real tie to the couple. The book is a suspense thriller, and you are taken along for a ride as Rachel and other characters try to figure out the mystery.

The two main aspects that I enjoyed the most about this book were the changes in perspective and the changes in time. Basically the majority of the chapters were from Rachel’s perspective, but Paula Hawkins also threw in chapters from Megan and Anna’s perspectives as well, which only added to the confusion and suspense in the plot. Also, each chapter jumped around in time, making it even more difficult to decipher what was happening.

If you’re the type of person who loves books that really make you think and keep you on your toes the entire way through, then you are sure to be entertained by this book! It’s actually being made into a movie with an awesome cast, and I can’t wait to see how that turns out. I think it has great potential to be a very gripping movie if done correctly. Think Gone Girl.

If you want another opinion on the book, I really enjoyed Janet Maslin’s New York Times review. Let me know in the comments if you’ve ever read this book and what you thought, or if you’ve read another good book lately that you’d recommend! I’m always on the hunt for new books to read.